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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
and the president have 24 days to reach a deal, before the fiscal cliff's tax hikes and spending cuts take effect. >> susie: mark zandi says "bad things will happen to the economy pretty fast" if lawmakers don't settle the fiscal cliff issue. he's chief economist of moody's analytics. so mark falling off the fiscal cliff means bad things. how bad? >> it could be quite bad, susie. i don't think it's if we get into january and we haven't settled this but if house mars haven't nailed thi down by early february, i think stock investors, bond investors will start to get very very nervous, start selling, risky businesses pull back and by the end of february when we start approaching the ceiling for the debt limit, i think we'll be back in recession. it will be a fairly severe recession. so policy makers have a few weeks but not much more than that. they have to get this together. >> susie: some people are saying that today's jobs report is very encouraging and that you can look at this as a way that maybe the economy can handle some stuff belt tightening because things are looking a little bit better.
the fiscal cliff. with $600 billion in automatic tax hikes and government spending cuts set to start next year, why aren't more firms postponing hiring decisions? >> what we're hearing from businesses is that it is really hard to actually pull back hiring right now, because they've already fired so many workers, gotten so lean that it's really difficult. >> reporter: but not all the surprises in the report were good. at 7.7%, the unemployment rate hit its lowest level since december 2008. but that was mostly due to people giving up their search for work. and there's another disappointing trend, weak wage growth. >> what we are not seeing is strong income generation. the slowing in wage gains-- the weak bargaining power of labor comes across in this report and >> reporter: so although the labor market is not getting worse, it's not getting a lot better, either. and there are plenty of risks that could cause businesses to cancel projects, and hiring plans. >> clearly one of the biggest risks is that we don't see a deal on the fiscal cliff, or that they drag it out over a number of months. a
cliff is a series of spending cuts and expiring tax credits set to take effect in 27 days. today the president made the case to a group of top business leaders. his plan calls for a higher tax rate on earned income exceeding $250,000 and republicans say that would be a job killer. though are pushing for raise revenue by closing tax loopholes and deductions, something that the president says would not raise enough cash. wendell is live with more on the white house. how much much revenue would the president's plan raise by raising the tax rates for high earners? >> about $1 trillion the next 10 years from the rate increase. that is just part of a package that also includes limits on deductions and tax credits and aims to pull in a total of $1.6 trillion. republicans want to keep tax rates the same b end deductions and loopholes but obama says that will not get the job done. >> it is not possible to raise the amount of revenue required for a balance the package if all you rely on is closing deductions and loopholes. let me amend that. it is possible to do theoretically but it is not
. host: a republican from missouri said, as washington debates the fiscal cliff on spending and taxes we should not forget the regulatory avalanche that awaits businesses in the new year. roughly 4,100 regulations are coming through the pipeline. not all regulations will affect small businesses, many will, however, and the compliance costs for small firms exceed that of their large competition by some 36%. guest: that -- it's difficult for a small business leader to come to the white house and talk about this. we try to put business leaders together to talk about those. on the regulatory front, the head of -- former hofede the office of regulatory affairs who recently left the white house were very aggressive about going out and meeting business leaders and looking for a new way to take input. cat's published results which -- before he left the white house which showed the rate of regulatory activity had drop and the value created by eliminating bad regulations or needless regulations and streamlining regulations had gone up when compared to the previous two administrations. guest: we're
the so-called fiscal cliff. >> you have to nail this down. uncertainty is killing us. >> reporter: top economists talked about the impact of tax increases and government spending cuts on the middle class. >> a couple thousand dollars, means a couple months rent for this family. >> reporter: the white house has made clear the country could go over the cliff, if republicans refused to raise taxes on the top 2% of american earners. >> for them to be burdened, unnecessarily, because democrats and republicans aren't coming together to solve this problem, gives you a sense of the costs involved in very personal terms. >> reporter: republican leaders say they will close loopholes loopholes and eliminate tax breaks to raise money. but insist that bush-era tax cuts must be extended for all americans. >> reporter: the standoff and the country's skyrocketing debt, concerns ryan shenecki. so much so that he's the guy in the suit, dancing gangnam style with former senator allen simpson. >> i'm keeping up on this baby. >> reporter: his group, the cankicksba
to break the tax and spending stalemate that threatens to take the country over the fiscal cliff in just over three weeks. meanwhile, one by one republicans are bowing to the president's demand that taxes go up for the wealthy. >> will i accept a tax increase as a part of a deal to actually solve our problems? yes. >> we don't have a lot of cards as it relates to the tax issue before year end. i mean, we have one house, that's it. the presidency and the senate in the democrats' hands. >> since we agree with democrats, 98% of the american people and 80% of the bush tax cuts, to me i would get that off the table so they don't worry about it. >> reporter: democrats insist taxes are going up on the rich no matter what. >> if you don't increase tax rates on the highest 2% of income earners, you cannot generate enough revenue to have meaningful deficit reduction. >> reporter: republicans want big spending cuts to programs like medicare and says. >> we don't want to be back here in another year, another ten years answering the same questions. >> reporter: as the talks continue on both sides of
enrollment next october apparen. up next, we are going to turn our attention to the fiscal cliff with jim doyle and get a business perspective on that. later on, looking at the different aspects of the fiscal cliff talks. a closer look at domestic spending. we will be right back. >> ♪ [video clip] >> give it to him hard. >> he is not safe on that bus. >> i've been on that bus. they are just as good as gold. >> all of us in this country are starting to see people coming out and talking about their experience of this phenomenon that so many of us have experienced in one way or another and have had no words for, other than adolescents, other than growing up. finally people are starting to say, this is not actually ia normal part of growing up. moment where there's a possibility for change. we decided to start the movie out of that feeling that voices were bubbling up to the surface to say this is not something we can accept any more as a normal part of our culture. >> the filmmaker has followed up her award winning film by gathering essays and stories together in "bully." hear more saturda
. tell me about energy policy and where it fits in with the fiscal cliff. what we will spend money on and how we were tightened our belts. >> the major place it fits is the right policy would create an environment which would produce a lot more revenue. that would help to reduce the debt. the federal government doesn't spend much money on energy. energy research is about $6 billion a year. i would like to see it doubled. this report is a blueprint for independence and i think it is the right blueprint. we are not in a position to be held hostage by anybody. it also focuses on find more and use less. what we can do in the federal government is i think invest in research and getting a 500-mile battery for electric cars and getting solar energy that is 1 kilowatt installed and finding a way to capture carbon from coal plants that can be turned into fuel that is commercially sold. we should look at the model of unconventional gas in terms of how our system and federal research and our system of private properties have produced a situation where we have a massive advantage over europe a
past the fiscal cliff, use automatic spending cuts to make sure taxes don't go up, at least on the great majority and then figure out what to do about the upper brackets, and if that is -- that would be a mechanism that would guarantee further action next year and as is very well possible they would disagree next year and there would be some sort of trigger or punishment for their lack of action. that sounds relatively simple, putting it all together could take at least a couple weeks after you have a deal, there could be some inevitable blow ups from conservatives in the house for the senate so a lot of it is speculation. secondly, a lot of of things that might go in this down payment, farm subsidy cuts, there is a proposal to make federal retirees--federal workers pay more towards their retirement, that can get pretty political pretty quickly. it is very much in flux. all of that presupposes they get an agreement. there is a school of thought that they can't get an agreement until after tax rates actually go. >> host: andrew taylor is with the associated press. does the yo
be directed to new spending instead of deficit reduction. the fiscal cliff must be averted to protect our economy for future generations. yesterday, house speaker john boehner asked the president to identify specific cuts he's willing to make for a balanced approach. i hope the president will take immediate action so progress can be made for a bipartisan solution. in conclusion, god bless our troops and we will never forget september 11 and the global war on terrorism. the speaker pro tempore: the time of the gentleman has expired. the chair recognizes the gentleman from new york. >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. mig-ins: mr. speaker, there are many lessons to be learned in the wake of the hurricane that devastated parts of new york and new jersey. one of which is the importance of electronic medical records and health information technology. while many hospitals and medical centers were damaged by the storm, hospitals that employed electronic medical records were able to ensure that vital health info
. the fiscal cliff involves nearly four dollars of anticipated revenue from higher taxes for every dollar of spending cuts, yet the president wants more revenue and fewer spending cuts. if we fell off the cliff, his plan calls for another round of stimulus spending. you have got to be kidding me. what the president's plan lacks is any reform in our entitlement system. the unrestrained growth in entitlement system is driving deficits and driving the debt even higher than the percentage of our gdp. it is estimated to be as high as $128 trillion. even if they confiscate all of the income that excesses $1 million, we cannot pay for the entitlement commitments that the federal government has made. we have made promises to ourselves that we simply cannot keep. without some sensible entitlement reform, our credit rating will be downgraded again. we will become a country that none of us recognize. secondly, fiscal plans failed to achieve their government budget deficit or debt reduction goals. dr. hassett has examined fiscal plans in other countries. on average, unsuccessful plans proposed an inc
about something that is on everybody's mind, the fiscal cliff. oh my goodness, the fiscal cliff is now just -- wow, 20 days away. so what are we going to do? some have suggested that we really have to deal with entitlements. and i'm here to agree that we can and we should deal with entitlements. certainly two of those issues, which i really don't think we ought to call entitlements but are fundamental programs here in america for americans, should be dealt with. one that some people want to put on the table really doesn't deal with the deficit at all, and that's social security. so before we even get into this discussion tonight, let's just understand or anybody that cares to take on this issue that in dealing with the fiscal cliff, social security is not the problem. the deficit is not caused by social security. social security has never been and in its present form, will not be part of the deficit issue. it's separate and apart. it is a special program. has its own source of revenue. has its own trust fund and isn't running the deficit at all and has not run a deficit. so let's put s
indicate that companies have been reacting to the fiscal cliff by pulling back on spending or hiring. why haven't we seen that show up in the jobs report? is there a concern that we might see more of a pullback into next year? >> i think that's exactly what this survey is saying. about 50% have already taken some action. i think companies right now are waiting to see what's going to happen and it really comes down to two major issues. if we can get this fiscal cliff issue resolved, then we are looking at a pretty optimismic outlook from our members. but if we don't get the fiscal cliff, almost 60% said they'll be looking at cutting jobs and/or layoffs. >> cfos are notoriously less sang win than ceos. it's not particularly surprising that this group is expressing some contingency plans. but on average, they expect the u.s. to add of a million jobs next year. so kind of a divide here between the view that on the other hand things are getting better and on the other hand there's a big uncertainty out there still. >> i think finance people always want to balance the book and ceos tend to be m
on one. keep in mind they're the ones trying to do the deal here to avert this fiscal cliff. the tax hikes, the spending cutting scheduled for the first of the week now. join ming me from washington is senator olympia snowe. are you hearing -- what might you be hearing between the president and spirit? >> i think it is optimistic in the sense that at least they have met once again because i think that that is going to be crucial and central to any resolution, to the fiscal cliff crisis. and the more they meet and more that they have these lines of communications opened on a daily basis and their staffs are meeting, the more likely we'll see a conclusion to this issue. but it is regrettable that it is this late in the day, given the uncertainty and the apprehension that it continues to create among the american people, and, of course, both within the markets here and abroad. but i think it is hopeful that they have begun to meet and have some discussions because i think we can breathe a sigh of relief that the lines of communication are open. >> are you breathing that sigh of relief?
spending. they said, quote: this is going to be a tough fight in the congress given the fiscal cliff. some members have not been friendly to disaster relief. but the care with which the package has been put together has given us a good head start. although that head start not good enough for at least one republican member of congress frank says governor christie made a responsible request federal aid based on careful comprehensive analysis of new jersey's needs having seen the devastation firsthand in my district during his visit. i'm disappointed president obama has come to a different conclusion. we should not short change nor add strings to the support residence, businesses and communities in my district and across the region desperately need and at least 125 people were killed by super storm sandy. right now the u.s. government saying sandy is on track to be the second or third costliest natural disaster ever behind hurricane katrina and close to hurricane andrew in 1992. clayton? >> peter doocy live from d.c. >> now for your headlines might be the biggest arrest related to that terror
that the president has adopted a deliberate strategy to slow walk our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. instead of reforming the tax code and cutting spending the president wants to raise tax rates. even if the president got the tax rate hike that he wanted, understand that we would continue to see trillion-dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see. listen, washington has got a spending problem not a revenue problem. if the president doesn't agree with our proposal i believe that he's got an obligation to families and small businesses to offer a plan of his own, a plan that can pass both chambers of the congress. we are ready and eager to talk to the president about such a plan. >> you did speak with the president earlier this week, can you characterize that call? did he have any kind of counter offer? also, we understand that he is making clear that it's got to be increase in rates for the wealthy or no deal. are you willing to give a little bit maybe not all the way to 39.6? >> the phone call was pleasant, just more of the same. the conversations that the staff had yesterday, jus
, 15% of our customers are telling us this discussion about fiscal cliff will affect what they spend on christmas. >> and most americans aren't close to finished with holiday shopping yet. giving retailers a hope for a big boost in the last few weeks beforesom christmas. 58% of those surveyed said they completed half or less of their holiday shopping so far. i've got a little guilt on that front. >>> joining us for more, global ceo of sanrio. welcome. waving to the world there. >> yes. >> happy holiday. >> wearing your brand, as well. >> happy holiday from mr. mann. >> we should point out that mr. men is a key part of your strategy which is changing, is it not? >> exactly. last year we started to did mergers. this is our first acquisition, international acquisition. >> which is buying the company that owns -- people may have seen these in book stores -- the little miss sunshine and little -- what's the male equivalent? >> yes. there's little miss series and mr. man series both. >> yeah. >> total over 60 characters. >> why buy that? what are you going do? >> we need portfolio. hello k
in the fiscal cliff talks? if they do not get the money from unemployment insurance. the jobs do not exist in the private sector to take on, then they spend less. that is bad for the economy. extending the programs would benefits. that is because the money trickles through the system. spent on food, housing, he teen, all of the basic necessities that give us a multiplier effect. host: this is from the national employment law project. who will be affected if the program ends. insurance will be cut off after payments for the week ended december 29. unemployment benefits without access to the euc by the end of the first quarter of 2013. tickets for those numbers a little bit and specifically the guest: there are two fundamental programs part of the extension. the important thing about them, this is what really counts in this, they provide the additional benefits passed the six months the market. additional benefits, they are possibly forced onto other kind of government programs like welfare. that is one important consideration to make. over the course of the year, as many as 10 million ameri
, he's not particularly interested in avoiding the fiscal cliff, and he's clearly not interested at all in cutting any spending. >> reporter: while democrats and republicans debate the size and specifics on tax increases, the two sides also remain apart on spending cuts, reforming entitlement programs like medicare and on the president's request to have greater power to raise the country's debt limit. but the news coming out of this one, "wall street journal" headlines saying that staff members from the president's team and from speaker boehner's team are genre assuming talks. we confirmed as of a couple of hours hag that that wasn't the case, so we're going to check on that right now. david: what they're talking about, we don't know. liz: maybe not dead in the water. david: thank you, rich, appreciate it. liz: we've got good news for all of you last minute shoppers out there coming up in the speed read. david: and up next, first on fox business, tom kloet, ceo of tmx group, a parent of the toronto stock exchange, on the impact of all these regulations coming out of our country. how wil
we had in vietnam surtax applied after military spending was already falling. falling office cliff would mean a recession. i think it could be much worse than cbo implies. 1, the economy is very fragile right now and vulnerable to a secondly, i think it has a horrible psychological impact on the business community and consumers who would totally lose confidence in our ability to govern. i agree with david that what we need right now is a downpayment, making some progress. one that probably involves the tax and spending side. and the pledge to do much more later. the important thing to know about the proposals on the street right now is that you can accept everything in the president's proposal for everything in speaker boehner's proposal and he would not solve the budget problems in the longer run. in my judgment, you need about twice what they have put on the table. i'm very troubled by the fact that we are giving the impression that we can solve this problem without imposing much pain on the middle-class. the president made that very explicit. he promised never to raise taxes on
of this is that some people are trying to downplay the affects of the fiscal cliff saying if we go over for a few days it will be okay. ceos aren't saying that. you look at third quarter gdp, companies are spending less money on software and equipment because they don't know what's going to happen. the effects of the fiscal cliff are already holding back some things. >> of course. what stood out to me from howard schultz, the people that need it the most, the average american will feel this to the core. confidence is the corner stone. >> it makes you make decisions, big decisions, small decisions. i'm not going to buy that or do that, i'm scared to death. here's my question for the two of you. are more big ceos falling in line with the yes, let's raise the taxes on the 2%? >> if i don't know if a majority. would you say a majority? >> i think they want a deal and people have to make -- it's hard to make compromises. >> we've heard it from goldman sac sachs, warren buffett, schultz. >> big names there. >> they want clarity. the interesting thing to me, the stock market and bond market haven't freaked o
which we're calling the fiscal cliff, when you have automatic tax increases and spending cuts, but as we, you know, the time goes, it's been three weeks since the election, i'm growing increasingly pessimistic. >> we're been talking about it on the show, chris, and brought up a couple of times that the president, if he does nothing, the tax cuts expire, and the defense cuts go into place, which is largely what the democrats want to have happened and republicans now making the argument. perhaps the president is not going to negotiate because he wants to simply step back and want things to unfold. do you buy that. i think he does want to compromise because if this were to go on long enough. i don't think it happens the first week after the fiscal cliff, but if you continue with this and all of the things that happen, all of the bush tax cuts expire, not only on the rich, but also the middle class, the spending cuts, about 100 million in the first year, you could grow according to the congressional budget office or unemployment back over 9% and the president clearly doesn't want that, but
. >> reporter: and secretary panetta has warned the fiscal cliff would hurt our national defense. he's expected to hold a news conference any minute now. he's getting the order from the white house to brace for massive budget cut us. now, the automatic spending cuts that would kick in if congress does not reach an agreement on the fiscal cliff would force the pentagon to slice about 10% of the budget. the defense industry projects one in five defense contracts in california would be lost. the aerospace industry is projecting that 135,000 department jobs would be cut along with 90,000 jobs for a total of about 225,000 jobs lost in california over the next few years. alison burns, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> 8:16. well, today will mark the 9 oth annual lighting of the national christmas tree. president obama and his family, they will flip a switch lighting that tree this evening. neil patrick harris, remember doogie howser? he will be hosting the event. james taylor and the fray will be among the group of perform. president calvin coolidge started this tradition back in 1923. >>> well, free flu shou
of this "fiscal cliff" drama, they spoke yesterday raising hopes that formal talks will resume on how to to avoid across-the-board spending cuts and tax increases. we have been saying this for weeks. they will kick in if a budget agreement is not reached by year's end. >>> a number of state lawmakers had their cars fixed and you paid for it. lawmakers lost the perk of a free car about a year ago at least 37 of them deciding to buy the cars. that was an option. they have been using them when the state sold them. first they had all the cars repaired and maintained at state expense. $78,000 worth of work. >> as a taxpayer, you know, it's my money going to it so it's frustrating. >> doesn't sound fair. we work really hard for our money. >> we do. but a source in the legislature says the work was worth it. the state got more money when it sold the cars that were not bought by the lawmakers but had the repairs done. they got more money for those cars. so i guess it evens out. >>> same-sex marriage is now legal in the state of washington. dozens of gay and lesbians got in line to pick up marriage licens
in a balanced agreement, he's not particularly interested in avoiding the fiscal cliff, and he's clearly not interested at all in cutting any spending. what the president is really interested in, as we learned just yesterday, is getting as much taxpayer money as he can, first, by raising taxes on small business that he believes are making too much money and then on everybody else, not so he can lower the debt or the deficit but so he can spend to his heart's contefnlts for months the president has been saying all he wants is to raise taxes on the top 2% so he can tackle the debt and the deficit. however, yesterday he finally revealed that's not really his true intent. by demanding the power to raise the debt limit whenever he wants, by as much as he wants, he showed what he's really after is assuming unprecedented power to spend taxpayer dollars without any limit at all. this isn't about getting a handle on deficits or debt for him. it's about spending even more than he already has. why else would he demand the power to raise the debt limit on his own? by the way, why on earth would we e
on averting the fiscal cliff. negotiations are pretty much at a standstill, but if you ask house speaker john boehner, he has an idea of who's holding things up. >> there are a lot of things that are possible to put the revenue the president seeks on the table. but none of it's going to be impossible. the president insists on his position. insists on my way or the highway. >> in his weekly white house address this morning, president obama responded to boehner's remark. >> i'm willing to make more entitlement spending cuts on top of the one trillion dollars in spending cuts i signed into law last year. but if we're serious about reducing our deficit while still investing in things like education and research that are important to growing our economy, and if we're serious about protecting middle class families, then we're also going to have to ask the wealthiest americans to pay higher tax rates. that's one principle i won't compromise on. >>> holiday hiring may have given a big boost to the jobs report released yesterday. retail hirers hired more people than any month on record since 1939. 146
about whether we will resolve the fiscal cliff and have some large down payment. when it comes to republicans and conservatives, there are three things to bearer in mind. one is the house republicans they were elected to cut spending and not raise taxes. that is one of the reasons it is hard to move toward. there are a number of revenues that would be acceptable to conservatives. the first one is one that speaker boehner put out almost immediately after the election. that is revenues to a stronger economy. that seems to be acceptable. also acceptable would be a way to reduce subsidies. you could see more premiums for things like flood insurance, pension plans and so forth. these are acceptable type of revenues to conservatives that are not getting a lot of discussions. also are forms of privatizing. we talked about public-private partnerships in transportation, and for structure. also all kinds of ways we can undertake a program of privatizing, involving asset sales and other services to generate revenues to the federal government that would be absolutely acceptable to conserva
spending cuts have on veterans if no agreement is reached on the so-called fiscal cliff. this is 30 minutes. >> thank you, tommy. first, let me thank secretary panetta for his unwaiverring support, both for those of us in va, and the men and women who wear and have worn the uniforms of the nation. our close partnership, this meeting that we have today, on their behalf, has never been more important than it is today. entering the holiday season, i thank the men and women who spend these holidays away from their families, defending our nation, we're all very grateful for their service and sacrifice. as leon and iñhr discussed very little of what we do here in va originates here. most of what we work on originates in dod, and that's why achieving our priorities at va requires this close and collaborative working relationship. we have more work to do, but with president obama's strong support and guy dance, we brought the two departments closer together than ever before. we've underwritten joint va-dod medical facilities where they make sense, harmonizing our acquisition decisions, and we've c
's an electronic thing. they're typing it essentially. >> will the resolution of the fiscal cliff and even some progress on our long-term problems, knowing that at best we're just putting off austerity, sooner or later it's coming, right? higher taxes and lower government spending, right? you combine that with reinhardt, rogoff and the idea we're in a 2% world all of a sudden, would doing the fiscal cliff make it possible to do 5% or are we just -- we know austerity's coming and we know -- i'm saying we've got a lot of debt -- i'm saying that we are maybe in a new -- we might be in a new normal. is there any reason to think we could do a 4% or 5%? >> nobody wants to take an automatic hit. the number you want to achieve and achieve it quickly, that's one aspect, but no one wants a huge hit, for example, to defense spending. >> do you think we'll get to 7% in unemployment? >> i do. 6.9%. >> even though we're facing the same kind of austerity as europe. >> i think american companies put americans back to work. >> and freeing up the corporate cash will overcome -- >> get rid of the uncertainty. >>
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)